When members of the Cincinnati community call for solutions to weeks of teenage violence that culminated in the deadly shootout in Smale Park, Cincinnati police say a children’s camp currently under way is a solution to promote peace and leadership. For the first time since 2017, Child is in Trauma Intervention, or CITI Camp, is taking place again at the Hays-Porter School in the West End after CPD ran out of funds to run the camp. Thanks to a $ 75,000 grant and a game from the City of Cincinnati, the camp is currently home to 50 children ages 10 to 12. The campers do not pay after they are accepted into the eight week program. The purpose of the day camp is to teach children vulnerable accountability and strong character through drills, classroom practice, field trips, overnight stays, and one-on-one interviews with members of the police force. Many of the camp staff are student resource officers on CPS campuses. “I think the camp changed me and just to be a better me and better for my sisters,” said Sarah Allen, camper and Sycamore Junior High seventh grader. She told WLWT that she can struggle with her temper, but the camp helped her control her emotions. “Usually I would start fighting people,” said Allen. “But I’ve learned to calm down and think about something good first, so I can take the next step.” Allen revealed that she comes to camp with the weight of life on her shoulders. “It’s pretty hard to talk about when my parents aren’t together,” Allen said. “And people are dying of my life.” Allen seeks solace through therapy, friends, and opening up to camp counselors WLWT that she wants to become a cop when she grows up and is grateful to be in the police-run camp. “It’s really strange because I never thought I’d be this close to a cop. But it’s, it’s good to know that while I’m here I am protected and that no one will hurt me. “Sgt. Eddie Hawkins has worked with children for more than three decades. As a retired SRO, he sees his calling serving the public by equipping and nurturing the young. “We’re working to make them leaders, not followers,” said Hawkins. “We’re working to get them to make good, solid decisions right away so they don’t get in Take the risk, don’t get hurt. “The July 4th shooting in Smale Park shocked Hawkins personally and professionally, especially as he also runs a camp to protect children from violence.” It makes me get out there and work harder. I can not. We can’t keep losing young people, “said Hawkins. While Hawkins admits the camp isn’t as flashy as others, he believes in the results to produce more mature and motivated children. He says his hope for graduates of the camp is in both both the immediate and the distant future. “I’m going to see you leave college and get a job,” Hawkin reflected on his desired legacy at the CITI camp. “You and your family come back and say, ‘That guy here did that for me. ‘ Or better yet, bring me your young people because hopefully I can do that until I’m very old, “Hawkins said.” Right now I’m the third generation of young people. “Camp is scheduled for August 7th Host a graduation ceremony and a festive family barbecue To learn more about upcoming CPS children’s engagement programs, click here.

When members of the Cincinnati community call for solutions to weeks of teenage violence that culminated in the deadly shootout in Smale Park, Cincinnati police say a children’s camp currently under way is a solution to promote peace and leadership.

For the first time since 2017, the Child in Trauma Intervention or CITI Camp will take place at the Hays-Porter School in the West End after the CPD ran out of funds to run the camp. Thanks to a $ 75,000 grant and a game from the City of Cincinnati, the camp is currently home to 50 children ages 10 to 12. The campers do not pay after they are accepted into the eight week program.

The purpose of the day camp is to teach children vulnerable accountability and strong character through drills, classroom practice, field trips, overnight stays, and one-on-one interviews with members of the police force. Many of the camp staff are student resource officers on the CPS campuses.

“I think the camp has changed me, and just to be a better me and be better for my sisters,” said Sycamore Junior High Seventh grader camper and Sycamore seventh grader Sarah Allen. She told WLWT that she can struggle with her temper, but the camp helped her control her emotions. “Usually I would start fighting people,” said Allen. “But I’ve learned to calm down and think about something good first, in order to take the next step.”

Allen revealed that she comes to camp with the weight of life on her shoulders.

“It’s pretty hard to talk about when my parents are gone,” said Allen. “And people are dying from my life.”

Everyone seeks solace through therapy, friends, and opening up to camp counselors. She told WLWT that when she grows up and is grateful to be in the police-run camp, she wants to become a police officer.

“It’s really strange because I never thought I’d be so close to becoming a cop. But it’s good to know that I’m protected while I’m here and that no one will hurt me. “

Sgt. Eddie Hawkins has worked with children for more than three decades. As a retired SRO, he sees his vocation in serving the public by equipping and promoting the next generation.

“We’re working to make them leaders, not followers,” said Hawkins. “We are working to ensure that you make good and solid decisions immediately so that you are not in danger of not being injured.”

Hawkins was shocked both personally and professionally by the July 4th shooting in Smale Park, as he also runs a camp to protect children from violence.

“It makes me get out there and work harder. I can’t. We can’t keep losing young people,” said Hawkins.

While Hawkins admits the camp isn’t as flashy as others, he believes in the results that will help produce more mature and motivated children. He says his hope for the camp’s graduates lies in both the immediate and distant future.

“I’ll see you graduate from college and get a job,” Hawkin reflected on his desired legacy at the CITI camp. “You and your family come back and say, ‘This guy did this for me.’ Or better yet, bring me your young people because hopefully I can do that until I’m very old, “said Hawkins. “Right now I’m in my third generation of young people.”

The camp is scheduled to host a graduation ceremony and a festive family barbecue on August 7th.

Click here to learn more about the upcoming CPS child participation programs.